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all_states_including_those_in_nato_shall_sign_ratify_and_within_10_years_comply_with_the_tpnw [2019/06/20 02:15]
174.116.81.6 [TPNW activism and NATO states]
all_states_including_those_in_nato_shall_sign_ratify_and_within_10_years_comply_with_the_tpnw [2019/06/20 02:18]
174.116.81.6 [Humanitarian Disarmament approach]
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 ==== Humanitarian Disarmament approach ==== ==== Humanitarian Disarmament approach ====
  
-Humanitarian disarmament consists of a body of law, a norm, and a movement. Civil society has been of critical importance to the creation of the TPNW, without which it probably would not have occurred. This has been organized by the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), who were acknowledged for their role in creating this landmark convention by the awarding of the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2017. Continued civil society activism will be equally critical to the adoption of the TPNW by all states, if there is is be strengthening of TPNW momentum. ICAN modeled its organization and approach on the path opened by the International Campaign to Ban Landmines which has worked to universalize the Antipersonnel Mine Ban Treaty (Ottawa Convention).((The humanitarian disarmament conventions or treaties include the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (2017); the Convention on Cluster Munitions (2008), and the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling,​ Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction (Antipersonnel Mine Ban Treaty 1997). Each of these conventions has an associated civil society movement linked with middle powers and like-minded governments,​ respectively the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, the Cluster Munition Coalition and the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. The coordination of civil society organizations with governments has sometimes been identified as the “Ottawa Process”, or the “Oslo Process”. The Arms Trade Treaty does not ban any weapons. However, it also employs humanitarian and human rights principles to curb the trade in arms, and its key civil society campaigning group is Control Arms. Several other campaigns have not yet achieved any binding law or other document, including the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, the International Network on Explosive Weapons, the Toxic Remnants of War.)) A key element towards mobilizing governments to join these treaties and conventions and to adhere to their prohibitions is norm-building.+Humanitarian disarmament consists of a body of law, a norm, and a movement. Civil society has been of critical importance to the creation of the TPNW, without which it probably would not have occurred. This has been organized by the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), who were acknowledged for their role in creating this landmark convention by the awarding of the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2017. Continued civil society activism will be equally critical to the adoption of the TPNW by all states, if there is to be strengthening of TPNW momentum. ICAN modeled its organization and approach on the path opened by the International Campaign to Ban Landmines which has worked to universalize the Antipersonnel Mine Ban Treaty (Ottawa Convention).((The humanitarian disarmament conventions or treaties include the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (2017); the Convention on Cluster Munitions (2008), and the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling,​ Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction (Antipersonnel Mine Ban Treaty 1997). Each of these conventions has an associated civil society movement linked with middle powers and like-minded governments,​ respectively the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, the Cluster Munition Coalition and the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. The coordination of civil society organizations with governments has sometimes been identified as the “Ottawa Process”, or the “Oslo Process”. The Arms Trade Treaty does not ban any weapons. However, it also employs humanitarian and human rights principles to curb the trade in arms, and its key civil society campaigning group is Control Arms. Several other campaigns have not yet achieved any binding law or other document, including the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, the International Network on Explosive Weapons, the Toxic Remnants of War.)) A key element towards mobilizing governments to join these treaties and conventions and to adhere to their prohibitions is norm-building.
  
 Norm-building for the goals of the TPNW  did not begin with the commitment of 122 states when they adopted the treaty’s text. However, obtaining 50 ratifications in the near term is a focus of some civil society campaigners. Once that number is obtained the TPNW will be in legal force, and a meeting of states party to the TPNW will take place. Once half of UN member states have ratified, some believe it will be possible to start speaking about non-possession of nuclear weapons as customary international law. However, a major obstacle remains, which is the eschewal of the treaty, to date, by nuclear weapon possessing states, and nuclear “umbrella” states, such as members of NATO.  Norm-building for the goals of the TPNW  did not begin with the commitment of 122 states when they adopted the treaty’s text. However, obtaining 50 ratifications in the near term is a focus of some civil society campaigners. Once that number is obtained the TPNW will be in legal force, and a meeting of states party to the TPNW will take place. Once half of UN member states have ratified, some believe it will be possible to start speaking about non-possession of nuclear weapons as customary international law. However, a major obstacle remains, which is the eschewal of the treaty, to date, by nuclear weapon possessing states, and nuclear “umbrella” states, such as members of NATO. 
all_states_including_those_in_nato_shall_sign_ratify_and_within_10_years_comply_with_the_tpnw.txt · Last modified: 2019/06/20 02:18 by 174.116.81.6